Jun 08 2016

Knowledge-sharing rules erased from the ETS legislative text

The ETS Directive 2009 put a requirement on the owners of installations that were awarded NER300 money to share results and experiences from its operation. The EC proposed removing this from the legislative text governing ETS Innovation Fund, leaving the only reference to knowledge-sharing in the recitals.

Neither Federley nor Duncan have so far drafted amendments that would put knowledge-sharing back into the legislative text. ***UPDATE 13 Sept 2016: The Greens-EFA have proposed amendments requiring knowledge-sharing (ITRE: 439; ENVI: 441)***

Stakeholders’ views

(as expressed in the public consultation on revision of the EU Emission Trading System (EU ETS) Directive)

BDEW and IOGP are pro. BDEW: “Projects shall be selected on the basis of objective and transparent criteria that include requirements for knowledge-sharing.” IOGP: “Pre-commercial/demonstration programmes should stimulate and maximise learning, as well as sharing and broadening knowledge in areas where there are gaps. This would increase confidence in CCS and also improve public support.” Finnish Forest Industries Association is anti: “More limited knowledge sharing. IPR should secure noticeable exclusive rights to the industrial player for more than 5 years.”

Shell says, “It would be beneficial if the EU Commission clearly defined foreground and background knowledge, with clear protection provided for knowledge developed by a company prior to it submitting an application.” [Editor’s note: The distinction is clear in the EC’s Horizon 2020 programme and was made clear as NER300 developed.]

  1. NER400.com’s comment

    MEPs or the Council should put knowledge-sharing rules into ETS Innovation Fund. They should be more robust than those of NER300, not less, and proportionate to the nature and amount of funding/finance required from the Fund.

    Companies that do not get awards must be allowed to stand on the shoulders of the lucky ones that do by learning from their mistakes or successes. Info on the installation’s performance should be published in the form, for example, of high-resolution time-series data-sets. This is necessary to make swift progress in bringing climate-protecting technologies to market and is consistent with the EC’s agenda on Open Data, recently given support in the Council.